This blog post was written by Joshua Grobart, a member of the T5 cohort. Josh interns at Free Geek, Tivnu Construction, and Community Warehouse....

This post was authored by Tivnu Gap Year participant Henry Belman. Henry is from Menlo Park, CA (by way of Brooklyn, NY) and he interns at Sisters of the Road, Urban Gleaners, and Tivnu Construction....

This post was authored by Ariana Finkelstein, a member of the Tivnu 4 Cohort, whose program ran from 2017-2018. Ari loves singing, Cheerios, and social justice. After her year with Tivnu, she went on to study at Mount Holyoke College, where she is currently a first-year student....

This blog post was authored by Desmond Griffith, a member of the Tivnu 5 cohort. Coming to Tivnu from Oakland, California, Desmond enjoys riding his bike during his free time and hanging out with fellow Tivnuniks. He interns at Learning Gardens Lab, Verde, and Tivnu construction....

Hello! My name is Devida, and it’s my turn to write a blog post! It is my first time writing a blog post, and I’m excited! Let’s start with a little bit about me: (you already know my name) I am 17, and I lived in Israel for 10 years, and moved back to the US about 4 years ago. This year, I am doing an internship at JOIN: Connecting the Street to a Home, which is a day shelter for people who experience homelessness and poverty. I also do tiny house construction two days per week.  In the past two weeks...

As I sit and ponder what to write about,  I find I always come back to the same topic… airplanes. Don’t fret--  I will not bore you with information about planes such as the function of winglets, or what reverse thrusters are,  or why the fly-by-wire system is a true gift to airline companies in terms of economics. I will tell you, however, that as simple as the design of an airplane is, the function of each individual part is, in fact, very complex. The idea of something simple being complex is one that I have been experiencing during my time...

“Hands up!”, commanded Tyharra Cozier, a young African-American woman. “Don’t Shoot!” I and about a hundred other people - mostly white and middle-aged - shouted in response. We were all being held captive, under arrest - by Tyharra’s captivating and arresting performance. Because that’s what it was; Tyharra was an actor and all of us with our hands held high were her audience. She was performing a monologue called “How I Feel,” written by Dennis A. Allen II. It was the last act of the fittingly named play “Hands Up: 7 Playwrights, 7 Testaments," a collection of seven monologues which...